Category Archives: ECT and memory loss

ECT at Lake Alice: a team of maggots

I have written here about psychiatrist Selwyn Leeks and the use of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) on children and young people at Lake Alice Hospital in New Zealand in the 1970s. On Monday 14 June 2021 a Royal Commission on Abuse … Continue reading

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ECT: back to Chelmsford

Last year I wrote a post about Chelmsford private hospital in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, and a legal case in which two doctors who carried out treatment at the hospital are suing the author and publisher of a book … Continue reading

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More about ECT and blinkered clinicians

In my last post I wrote about “blinkered clinicians” from New Zealand, who for many years had treated a man for a “mood disorder” when he actually had a brain tumour. This post is about a man in Victoria, Australia, … Continue reading

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Cognition is not a team sport

Last year the journal Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica published an article by a group of Dutch and Belgian psychologists and psychiatrists about electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and cognitive function (J. Obbels, E. Verwijk et al., Long-term neurocognitive functioning after electroconvulsive therapy in … Continue reading

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ECT and misinformed consent

The Royal College of Psychiatrists have withdrawn their electroconvulsive (ECT) patient information leaflet from their website, although more or less identical leaflets can still be found on the websites of individual National Health Service (NHS) hospitals. The Royal College website … Continue reading

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ECT in the New Yorker

This month’s edition of The New Yorker features an article about the writer Dan Mallory: “A suspense novelist’s trail of deceptions” by Ian Parker. Mallory, writing under the name of A.J. Finn, is author of best-selling thriller The woman in … Continue reading

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Isn’t there anyone in Scotland who can write an ECT leaflet?

In October 2017 the Scottish ECT Accreditation Network (SEAN) published a leaflet about electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). It claims to present “the latest evidence” but in fact it is a reprint of a leaflet published in 2000 with a few numbers … Continue reading

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ECT in the Sunday Mirror and on Sky News

The Sunday Mirror on 13 January 2019 ran a feature about the use of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in England: “Teenagers with mental health issues given brain electric shock therapy on NHS.” The article came up with some statistics: “Figures obtained … Continue reading

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ECT and young men

In the United Kingdom, as in other Western countries, women and older people are overrepresented in electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) statistics. The most recent figures from the Royal College of Psychiatrists show that about two-thirds of ECT patients are women and … Continue reading

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Ewen Cameron: more legal cases

News came a few months ago that a woman in Canada had received compensation from the Canadian government for the damaging treatment her mother had been given by psychiatrist Ewen Cameron at the Allan Memorial Institute at McGill University in … Continue reading

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